An Awesome Comparison Guide for Creating Location-Based Deals

Deals. They are everywhere these days. With our economy in a serious recession, consumers are laser-focused on getting the most for their money and EVERYONE loves a great deal.With the advent of location-based applications like Foursquare and Facebook Places, deals are becoming more relevant than ever before. The ability to geo-target a consumer walking into your store or down your block is a marketing first so it’s not surprising that many platform developers are jumping on the ‘location-based’ bandwagon.

All the hype surrounding these new tools makes it difficult for  business owners to make informed decisions about where to put their efforts. So let’s examine the facts and compare some of the more popular applications side by side.

You can follow the ‘via’ link above to go to the source and read the rest of the article if you’re interested in learning more…

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How to Write Copy that Connects using a Tried and True Formula

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Today, people are just plain busy – busy working, busy running around doing stuff, busy worrying about being too dang busy. It’s what makes grabbing their attention long enough to get them to make a buying decision so challenging. Your message needs to connect right away or they will move on. Period.

So how do you create the urgency that gets distracted (and distractible) prospects to sit up and pay attention? How do you get them to take immediate action? You need to speak to what motivates THEM. You need to connect the dots between what they need and more importantly, want and what you offer.

 

Google fires a shot at Yelp; brings Hotpot recommendations to Maps

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Throwing caution to the wind and firing a shot over the bow of Yelp, Google has just announced that it has implemented Hotpot recommendations into Google Maps for your desktop. While it’s not yet perfect, according to the Google Lat Long Blog, “we’ll be building it out over time, making it even easier for you to keep track of your friends’ activities”.

Where will this get really interesting? Look at Google’s near-field communication that it has embedded into the Nexus S. Imagine going into a local venue and having your phone recognize where you are. You’re then given the chance to put a Hotpot recommendation into the system and your friends can immediately see what you think of the place.

Of course, that part is somewhat in the future. For now, it’s still a great recommendation system (and better in some ways than Yelp, even, by our standards) and well worth a try. Want to give it a shot, just head over to Google Hotpot and sign yourself up.

What do we want? A newly-updated version of Google Maps with Hotpot overlays, please.

This is HUGE. Ask me why… 😀

Are Facebook Pages Killing the Corporate Web Site?

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On the weekend, I was watching the National Football League playoff game between the New York Jets and Indianapolis Colts. Aside from the action on the field, one thing that caught my attention was a commercial from Sears that ended with a suggestion that people visit Sears’ Facebook Page rather than sears.com.

The promotion of a corporate Facebook Page is not new but seeing a high-profile company put the spotlight on Facebook rather than its corporate Web site was, nevertheless, interesting.

It wasn’t that long ago that having a Web site was the core of a company’s digital presence. And while Web sites are still important and essential, Facebook has changed the digital dynamic.

Facebook Pages can be a compelling alternative to a corporate website — especially for a small business. Comment or ‘connect with me’ to discuss how this applies to your business…

3 Questions to Ask When Planning Your Website

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The following is an excerpt from “Make the Website Work: The Small Agency’s Guide to Creating Effective Marketing Sites for Themselves and Their Clients,” Mark O’Brien’s forthcoming book to be published in 2011 by Rockbench. O’Brien is the president of web-development firm Newfangled.

You’ve heard from O’Brien before.  I interviewed him last October for “Five Web Development Myths Debunked.” And on Feb. 10, O’Brien will present “Cure for the Common Website: Using Personas to Boost Site Performance,” right here at MarketingProfs—$129 well spent, free for Pro members.

O’Brien says planning a website is hard to do, and most people miss the mark because they jump right into “doing” before giving enough attention to the planning. He suggests that the next time you start a web project, try starting by asking yourself these three questions:

  1. Who am I trying to attract?
  2. What do they want from my website?
  3. What do I want from them?

These deceptively simple questions will get you started on the right track for planning your site and the criteria by which you’ll measure its success for years to come.

We develop on WordPress and these three questions came just in time for the new website we’re building!

Streaming CES: How We Did It

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As the 2011 Consumer Electronics Show wraps up today, we’d like to share a few secrets. The CrunchGear writing team, with support from TechCrunch TV, provided more than 20 hours of live CES video coverage, taking our viewers right to the industry and media access only exhibit floor. For a look at video highlights, check out ces.crunchgear.com. Hundreds of Twitter questions were answered in real-time, giving our viewers a chance to interact with the company reps and win some giveaways. We also got a lot of questions on how we did it.

The traditional, old-school way of broadcasting a live event would involve driving up a satellite truck with a C or Ku band transmitter. Or, getting a special expensive video fiber circuit connected at the venue. But, that would only allow a video feed from a single location. Otherwise we’d need multiple circuits or time to drive and set-up the sat truck at different locations.

We wanted to stream at a moments notice, from the Sands Expo during CES Unveiled and the following Media Day, from the inside and outside the Las Vegas Convention Center, and from hotel parties and events all over the Las Vegas Strip. Plus, we wanted to roam the halls without any wired connection. We investigated some RF and microwave transmitter options but they involved great expense and production limitations. We finally settled on a mobile streaming solution, with a backup ‘nearly live’ wired solution. We never needed to resort to the taped backup.

If you’ve ever tried to ‘cover’ a tradeshow with social media + technology like I have, you’ll be fascinated with the rest of this article. Follow the ‘via’ link above…

Do You Have What — and Whom — It Takes to Compete in a Digital World?

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We live in a world that’s increasingly connected, digital and mobile, and influenced by social networks. The shopping and media-consumption patterns of consumers are evolving at a dizzying clip. Entire industries such as travel and music have been largely reshaped almost overnight. Multibillion-dollar, digitally enabled companies evolve in a few short years. 

All of this has the management teams of all sorts of companies asking a key question: “Are we prepared to operate in an increasingly technology-driven world?”

Companies that have the right leaders in place will be able to answer with a confident “Yes.” Spencer Stuart recently completed a global and multisector study to provide insights into this very issue. Through 50 interviews with top-level executives in nine industry sectors across North America, Europe and the Asia Pacific region, we honed in on a series of best practices for companies building their organization’s digital capabilities.

If you’re challenged like I am with moving an analog company into a digital world, read on by following the ‘via’ link…