3 Questions to Ask When Planning Your Website

WordPress Logo

Image via Wikipedia

The following is an excerpt from “Make the Website Work: The Small Agency’s Guide to Creating Effective Marketing Sites for Themselves and Their Clients,” Mark O’Brien’s forthcoming book to be published in 2011 by Rockbench. O’Brien is the president of web-development firm Newfangled.

You’ve heard from O’Brien before.  I interviewed him last October for “Five Web Development Myths Debunked.” And on Feb. 10, O’Brien will present “Cure for the Common Website: Using Personas to Boost Site Performance,” right here at MarketingProfs—$129 well spent, free for Pro members.

O’Brien says planning a website is hard to do, and most people miss the mark because they jump right into “doing” before giving enough attention to the planning. He suggests that the next time you start a web project, try starting by asking yourself these three questions:

  1. Who am I trying to attract?
  2. What do they want from my website?
  3. What do I want from them?

These deceptively simple questions will get you started on the right track for planning your site and the criteria by which you’ll measure its success for years to come.

We develop on WordPress and these three questions came just in time for the new website we’re building!

Most Say No to Government Regulation of Search Engines

a chart to describe the search engine market

Image via Wikipedia

Most Americans give high marks to Internet search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing and don’t think the government needs to regulate their responses.

The latest Rasmussen Reports national telephone survey finds that 77% of Adults say there is no need for government regulation of the way that search engines select the recommendations they provide in response to search inquiries. Just 11% believe such regulation is necessary, while just as many (12%) are not sure. (To see survey question wording, click here).

The most frequent Internet users are the least likely to think regulation is needed for search engine recommendations.

 

Lunch with Audi’s CEO, Part I

Bypass the 20 Twitter List Limit with a Sidekick Account