Are Facebook Pages Killing the Corporate Web Site?

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On the weekend, I was watching the National Football League playoff game between the New York Jets and Indianapolis Colts. Aside from the action on the field, one thing that caught my attention was a commercial from Sears that ended with a suggestion that people visit Sears’ Facebook Page rather than sears.com.

The promotion of a corporate Facebook Page is not new but seeing a high-profile company put the spotlight on Facebook rather than its corporate Web site was, nevertheless, interesting.

It wasn’t that long ago that having a Web site was the core of a company’s digital presence. And while Web sites are still important and essential, Facebook has changed the digital dynamic.

Facebook Pages can be a compelling alternative to a corporate website — especially for a small business. Comment or ‘connect with me’ to discuss how this applies to your business…

3 Questions to Ask When Planning Your Website

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The following is an excerpt from “Make the Website Work: The Small Agency’s Guide to Creating Effective Marketing Sites for Themselves and Their Clients,” Mark O’Brien’s forthcoming book to be published in 2011 by Rockbench. O’Brien is the president of web-development firm Newfangled.

You’ve heard from O’Brien before.  I interviewed him last October for “Five Web Development Myths Debunked.” And on Feb. 10, O’Brien will present “Cure for the Common Website: Using Personas to Boost Site Performance,” right here at MarketingProfs—$129 well spent, free for Pro members.

O’Brien says planning a website is hard to do, and most people miss the mark because they jump right into “doing” before giving enough attention to the planning. He suggests that the next time you start a web project, try starting by asking yourself these three questions:

  1. Who am I trying to attract?
  2. What do they want from my website?
  3. What do I want from them?

These deceptively simple questions will get you started on the right track for planning your site and the criteria by which you’ll measure its success for years to come.

We develop on WordPress and these three questions came just in time for the new website we’re building!